Cooking with frozen eggs
Cooking with frozen eggs
We had a frittata for dinner, but discovered that 4 of the 16 or so eggs were frozen. We improvised. As it turns out, you can cook the frozen eggs slowly, roughly scrambling them as you go, and when they are defrosted and partially cooked, just add the other ingredients. It worked fine. Photo by Justin.
A grasshopper
A grasshopper
This little guy found his way into our third floor apartment. Lucky us! Photo by Peter.
We took the train into Munich.
We took the train into Munich.
Map with added bonus of handsome men. Photo by Peter.
The stairs inside of the museum
The stairs inside of the museum
Photo by Cathy
This chart tells you quite a bit about turbines.
This chart tells you quite a bit about turbines.
Find out more at Wiki page. Photo by Cathy.
Precision Sundial
Precision Sundial
Sundials are hard to pass up
A collection of dead flies
A collection of dead flies
We kept running into dead flies inside of the apartment. Ironically, this was our last Munich picture. We had a great stay, really. Photo by Justin on Peter's camera.
The leftover chocolate (taken home, of course!)
The leftover chocolate (taken home, of course!)
We plan for leftover chocolate. It gets divided up for us all to enjoy. Photo by Justin.
Interesting church door.
Interesting church door.
I love the surprises in the sculptures in this church. Peter and Paul Church (Telfs). Photo by Cathy
Cute rooster over a doorway.
Cute rooster over a doorway.
Peter and Paul Church (Telfs) Photo by Cathy
Facinating table legs.
Facinating table legs.
Photo by Cathy
Another shrew
Another shrew
As we were starting out today, Peter found another dead shrew. We suspect a cat is killing them, but not eating them as they may not taste so good...and some are even venomous.

As per Wiki (link) "Shrews are unusual among mammals in a number of respects. Unlike most mammals, some species of shrews are venomous. Shrew venom is not conducted into the wound by fangs, but by grooves in the teeth. The venom contains various compounds, and the contents of the venom glands of the American short-tailed shrew are sufficient to kill 200 mice by intravenous injection. One chemical extracted from shrew venom may be potentially useful in the treatment of high blood pressure, while another compound may be useful in the treatment of some neuromuscular diseases and migraines.[8] The saliva of the northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda) contains soricidin, a peptide which has been studied for use in treating ovarian cancer.[9] Also, along with the bats and toothed whales, some species of shrews use echolocation. Unlike most other mammals, shrews lack zygomatic bones (also called the jugals), so have incomplete zygomatic arches."

Photo by Cathy
Certifying that this is the longest bridge
Certifying that this is the longest bridge
Photo by Peter
More mythology... glad to see it.
More mythology...  glad to see it.
Photo by Cathy
Mythology
Mythology
Photo by Cathy
A little mythology.
A little mythology.
The Leutasch Gorge also has some local mythology worked in along the trails. Link Photo by Cathy
Hay Gobblins
Hay Gobblins
Photo by Cathy
We visited the camels. We need to come up with some speech bubbles to go with this.
We visited the camels.  We need to come up with some speech bubbles to go with this.
July 28th. Photos by Cathy
Interesting perspective of horses
Interesting perspective of horses
Photo by Justin
Linotype keyboard
Linotype keyboard
Peter took this keyboard picture to see whether the famous "etaoin shrdlu" appeared as the leftmost two columns of keys. Apparently, the German keyboard layout for the Linotype differed from the English and there is a whole wiki page on titled "Etaoin shrdlu." See link. Photo by Peter
A pretty wild table
A pretty wild table
Could this have been an inspiration for the movie "Alien"? There were several tables in the gallery which had very elaborately carved bases, but this one was a favorite. Photo by Cathy.